How not to end a love triangle

Infernal Devices: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

Here there be spoilers.

This is the last in the series, and resolves both the story and the love triangle. There were a few really, really big twists that were all pretty good and definitely squee worthy.

I would like to address the love triangle though, because that was a pretty good  and big part of the story that was kind of a cop out. The love triangle has to end of course because the book is over. And it was  a really good love triangle because Tessa loved both Will and Jem for real reasons that make sense for her. Both bring something into her life that makes her feel special and beautiful and brings love to her heart.

So how does the author get out of these two excellent character being equally deserving of the love of the heroine?

Well she kills one of them. But it’s a trick kill – they aren’t really dead. And then as it turns out, two of them are immortal. So naturally, Tessa stays with one of them until he dies of old age and then eventually catches up with the immortal one when chance allow.s

This was a very satisfying ending because I liked both potential lovers but it was also not, I don’t know – emotional I guess? It felt like 2.75 novels building up to Tessa having to make a terrible choice but then she lucks out, circumstance just takes her decision away from her and she just gets to have both. And something about that just made her seem like a victim of circumstance, not her own heart. That was a little disappointing, that’s all.

Last Movie I watched:

Nope. No clue.

Last TV show I watched:

Supernatural. I’m getting through it.

Advertisements

The triangle continues to grow. As does my love for Magnus Bane

Infernal Devices: Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare

This book continues the love triangle/Shadowhunter history started in Clockwork Angel. I’m not sure why, if it’s because I read it a while ago or if its a reflection on the book itself, but I don’t remember it as clearly as I remember the first and third book. I’m sure some details are revealed, at least one character dies, and there are a few good “gasp! No!” moments but overall it was really just a great bridge between a good setup in the first book and a great payoff in the third.

I did really enjoy this series though. Strongly recommend.

Last movie I watched:

Who knows?

Last TV show I watched:

Supernatural.

Love Triangles

Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

Once again, I read this book a long time ago, but like all the Cassandra Clare books, I really enjoyed it. Although it was very heavily based on a love triangle, which I don’t usually like, but Clare did a great job of making all members of of the triangle equally developed instead of having one poor player basically be a straw man there for dramatic tension, instead of being actually lovable.

The supporting cast was also excellent and there were some really, really good reveals, as well as Magnus Bane, making it all in all a great reading experience.

Last movie I watched:

I’m really not sure. Part of 101 Dalmatians I think?

Last TV episode I watched:

How I Met Your Mother. Fun times.

A choice

I am almost 10 books behind on my blog and I was considering giving up. But I’m going to try not to. So here we go:

Summer Tree by Gavriel Kay

This book took me so long to get through, but it was absolutely amazing. It reminded me of Dune in some ways. Like Dune it suffers somewhat from having a million characters and several dozen story lines that can be hard to keep track of. Like Dune, it is a really serious commentary on humanity.

It’s the story of a small group of people who cross from the University of Toronto (which is cool, since I went there) into another world, a fantasy world, right as it needs them the most. Each of them struggle, suffer and make a massive sacrifice in their roles in it’s salvation.

While I read it took long ago to have anything really thoughtful about it now, I definitely recommend it. It’s an adult book for sure, and the writing is slow and careful, but so, so worth it.

Last movie I watched:

Part of Brave. Fun movie. Very Scottish

Last TV show I watched:

Part of Shadowhunters. I’m not sure it’s a great show, but I love it

How to start a family

Double Pregnant: Two Lesbians Make a Family by Natalie D. Meisner

This thin little novel is a rare piece of nonfiction for me. It’s the true story of a lesbian couple in Canada who decide they want to have a baby, and then a baby each and then because their doctors advise them that they’re too old to wait a baby each at the same time. Thus begins their quest to find a sperm donor, successfully inseminate, get through two pregnancies and survive two labours.  It is a love story and a relationship story and an LGBTQ story and parenting story and overall a great read.

Being a true story, Meisner doesn’t hide the dirtier truths about relationships, hurt feelings, miscarriages, grief, broken promises, uncomfortable situations and generally being directionless in your adult life and that makes the book striking and interesting. I also like how comforting it is to read stories about people who are like you – struggling with where they want to be but determined to fulfill their goals, in love but vulnerable and afraid sometimes and facing the unique challenges of being a lesbian couple.

The language is beautiful, particularly Meisner’s description of her wife and their children, both born and unborn.

All around loved it.

Last movie I watched:

The end of Star Trek Beyond. It didn’t get better. I’m disappointed.

Last TV episode I watched:

One of the final ones in Supernatural season 11. So they killed God I guess?

Biological warfare, ethics and pacifism for the under 13 crowd

Gregor the Overlander: Curse of the Warm Bloods by Suzanne Collins

Fair warning from the start: I am going to spoil this book. Now, in my defense, I did guess the big reveal in the third or forth chapter,so maybe the spoilers aren’t that huge, but you know… just in case.

Gregor is once again summoned to the Underland by his friends there, when a dangerous plague breaks out and starts killing all the warm bloods – humans, rats, bats and mice. However, his mother is unwilling to just let him and Boots, his baby sister, disappear into the darkness again, so she goes with them. Suitably embarrassed to introduce his mother to the people who call him Warrior, Gregor, his Mom and Boots arrive. They learn that Aries, Gregor’s beloved bat was the first known case, that the rats are continuing to suffer in their war against the humans and soon Gregor’s mother comes down with the plague. Guided by a prophecy and a jittery medical doctor, Gregor and Boots lead a quest of all species (human, bat, rat and cockroach) to get the cure – a special flower. But ultimately the quest fails and then they realize – the cure was always with them because the humans had been trying to engineer it the whole time, so they could use the sickness as a biological weapon against the rats. They turn back, and when they arrive home, they learn that the humans have found a cure, Gregor’s mom and Aries will be fine but Gregor’s view of his friends is forever altered. A lot less hopefully then usual, Gregor and Boots go home (their Mom is not well enough to travel), setting up the next book.

Obviously the Hunger Games, Collins much bigger (better) series, has a lot of equally large and grim commentary. This whole series does too, but biological warfare and whether or not it’s ever okay (Gregor votes no, and I think I do too) is a pretty serious concept for a middle school child. Having said that, they probably deserve a story that helps them understand what they’ve seen or likely will see on the news. It also does a good job of breaking down the theory of pacifism through a character who, after being responsible for the death of dozen of rats, including babies, refuses to fight again. Really overall, it’s a good Big Ideas book.

Also Boots, the baby, is well handled and very adorable.

Overall, I enjoyed the book, although I didn’t have a problem putting it down and coming back to it later. But it gave me a lot to think about.

Last movie I watched:

Cloud Atlas. I really liked it but I think I missed something

Last TV episode I watched:

Orphan Black!!!!! Everyone needs this show in their life.

 

 

Silence, talking and love

Deafening by Frances Itani

Full disclaimers: this is an adult book so it’s a little out of the norm for me, but in the name of being well rounded or something, I read it on the recommendation of my mother and it was beautiful.

Grania lost her hearing when she was very young after scarlet fever. Her childhood is happy, if silent, mostly because of the way her live is woven together with her family, particularly Mamo her grandmother and Tress her sister. With her family around her she navigates the hearing world by lip reading, some voice and a homemade version of sign language. But when she is nine years old, she’s sent away to a special school in Belleville, where deaf children learn not just to communicate but also the skills they will need to find good jobs.

Years later Grania meets, falls in love with and marries Jim, a hearing man. Despite the difficulties they face because of Grania’s disability, nothing is as terrible as Jim leaving to fight in the First World War. Oceans apart, both face the terrible cost of war.

To me, this story is about love, grief and the way we talk to the people we love. The love and grief are quite closely linked. Grania is witness to her sister, her mother and her grandmothers’ tragic marriage. Tress’s husband’s terrible maiming in the war pulls them further apart even then his death would have done. Her mother’s marriage to her father has simply turned stale as time as passed them, leaving both feeling lonely and isolated even when they are together. Mamo’s husband died the crossing from Ireland and was buried at sea, Mamo and her eldest daughter forced to continue on with the rest of her children. As each relationship comes upon something that cannot be overcome, Grania and Jim maintain their feelings for each other, despite the trauma Jim has endured, their closeness despite the distance and both overcome their struggles and find their way home.

Through all of this, there is great loss both to the war and the Spanish flu and the characters all flail n the face of the crippling agony of grief, each one seeking relief from their pain, through drinking or withdrawing or turning off or smashing broken plates but still there is some grief that is too big to live through, Mamo says often.

And underpinning all of this is the language of love and pain. Because Grania’s unique situation, her view of communication is totally different then other peoples. She sees talking as more like breathing, more like shapes and in her silent world lips alone make meaning. Her voice is a thing both part of her and not, so when she uses it she always has something worth hearing. Letters, the life line between Canada and the war, are both sacred and corruptible because they are all that Grania has to send to Jim but every time feels like a hope only, never a certainty – the boat could sink, it could get lost, Jim could die before they reached him, it’s all a risk to her. The most beautiful and profound way Jim and Grania communicate is through their own hand signals, through their breathing and be revealing their most intimate thoughts to each other. The writing is incredible beautiful and in a world where we can exchange words constantly but rarely ever communicate the story is very poignant.

It also won a whole bunch of Canadian literary awards, which it completely deserves, at least in my mind. A beautiful story about a terrible time.

Last movie I watched:

Contracted. I thought it was stupid. I mean, it’s a horror movie and it was pretty horrible. But the story was stupid, senseless and from a feminist angle completely awful.

Last TV episode I watched:

Downton Abby. Sybil, oh Sybil.